and they conjured spirits to make you smile

Ask me anything   Kaya
19
Singapore


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aureatiago:

Before Sunrise (1995) - Before Sunset (2004) - Before Midnight (2013)

love, imperfect, as it is

(via wednesdaydreams)

— 5 hours ago with 727 notes
#julie still looks as perfect as ever! 

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

In a new project called “OMG, Who Stole My Ads?” French street artist Etienne Lavie makes it his mission to transform the ad space in Paris into an outdoor art gallery. He has been travelling around the city, snatching up posters and billboards, and replacing them with fine specimens of French art from an earlier era. If our senses have over-developed to the point where we need to be visually stimulated at all times outdoors, just to keep up continuity, then we might as well at least occasionally glimpse something that moves us—something we might elect to look at voluntarily. Lavie’s project gives that gift to a lucky subset of Parisian commuters.

(Source: asylum-art, via ball-of-wool)

— 5 hours ago with 5058 notes
"Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could; some blunders and absurdities have crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day."
Ralph Waldo Emerson (via h-o-r-n-g-r-y)

(Source: littlefootlove, via inaspurrofthemoment)

— 1 day ago with 11217 notes
theniftyfifties:

Illustration by Rene Gruau for Christian Dior, 1955

theniftyfifties:

Illustration by Rene Gruau for Christian Dior, 1955

(Source: simplymagdorable)

— 1 day ago with 538 notes
"As higher education is transformed into a business or increasingly militarized, young people find themselves on campuses that look more like malls or recruiting stations for the national security state. Moreover, they are increasingly taught by professors who are hired on a contractual basis, have obscene work loads, and can barely make enough money to survive. Tenured faculty members are now called upon to generate grants, establish close partnerships with corporations, and teach courses that have practical value in the marketplace. What was once the hidden curriculum of many universities—the subordination of higher education to corporate values—has now become an open and much celebrated policy of both public and private higher education. There is little in this vision of the university that imagines young people as critical citizens or critical agents, educated to take seriously their role in addressing important social issues and bearing some responsibility for strengthening and deepening the reach of a real and substantive democracy. Addressing education as a democratic endeavour begins with the recognition that higher education is more than an investment opportunity, citizenship is about more than consuming, learning is about more than preparing for a job, and democracy is about more the false choices offered under a rigged corporate state and marketplace."
— 1 day ago with 346 notes
fotojournalismus:

A girl reads a book on her balcony as smoke rises from chimneys of a steel plant, on a hazy day in Quzhou, Zhejiang province, China on April 3, 2014. (William Hong/Reuters)

fotojournalismus:

A girl reads a book on her balcony as smoke rises from chimneys of a steel plant, on a hazy day in Quzhou, Zhejiang province, China on April 3, 2014. (William Hong/Reuters)

— 5 days ago with 485 notes
fashionsfromhistory:

Headdress
19th Century
Chalacha People, Mongolia
VCM

fashionsfromhistory:

Headdress

19th Century

Chalacha People, Mongolia

VCM

(via mashamorevna)

— 6 days ago with 1016 notes

2brwngrls:

Whether you agree with Suey Park or not, the way this interview was handled was abominable and disgusting. This was set up from the very beginning to make her opinion look “stupid.” 

I have to agree - using racist jokes, even in the name of so-called “satire” will not do anything to actually end racism. it just gives white people an excuse to laugh at POC’s expense, and feel like they’re not being assholes for it. look at chapelle’s show. People may say that Suey is overreacting, but honestly, as she points out, sometimes you HAVE to overreact because it’s the only way to be heard. In America especially, (white) people are terrified of making black jokes, but Asian jokes are still free reign. Do you think Colbert’s team would have written a similar joke about black people? Or even Latinos? Casual racism against Asians is still considered OK, and it’s NOT OK, and we can debate what “satire” is all we want, but we shouldn’t debate an Asian’s woman’s right to be angry or simply fed up after a lifetime of having to deal with this bullshit. White liberals are the worst.

Like the quote says, white people really think that racism is “a feeling,” they REALLY don’t get it is a system that we all play a part in whether we want to or not. Ambushing Suey like this was not productive, it was not a teachable moment. All they wanted to do was make her look like an unreasonable Angry Asian woman, pitting her against two white men who were completely unequipped intellectually to handle the conversation in a useful way. “As a white man, I have no right to share my opinion…” How fucking patronizing.

White men are so fucking butthurt when they are called out for being white men, when the fact that they benefit from living in a patriarchal, white-run society is acknowledged. How dare she call them out, right? How dare she point out that they could never even begin to understand where she comes from because they’ve never fucking had to? This makes my blood boil. When I first saw the joke in question, guess what? I didn’t find it offensive. I couldn’t wrap my head around what was so wrong. Like others, I thought to myself, “but it’s ~satire~~~ right?”

But guess what? I am not an Asian woman.

The experience of an Asian woman is beyond my realm of understanding. So what did I do? I read, and I learned, and I unlearned the racist and anti-Asian thinking that we are all susceptible to, whites and POC alike, when we live in a racist society. I may not understand fully, but if there’s one thing I’m not going to do, I’m not going to ridicule or diminish anyone’s right to feel angry, to turn that anger into a joke. I have some Asian-American friends who have rolled their eyes and called this ridiculous.

I also can’t judge them for not finding the tweet offensive, for agreeing with their white liberal friends that it was “satire.” But there is a larger discussion to be had about anti-Asian attitudes that people are going out of their way to step over in order to intellectually belittle Suey Park and I am NOT HERE FOR IT. 

- Z

— 1 week ago with 8347 notes
#cancel colbert  #white people  #ughhh  #suey park